this has been a constant theme at clé. and recently, we’ve been asking ourselves this question, not just in the way we select our products, support our artists, work with our clients and engage with our team mates. but we’ve also been asking ourselves the bigger question- how can we make a difference every day for one another, in our communities and in our world.
We also regret using cement tiles. They look great on day 1, but even properly sealed they stain. We are very careful with our tiles, but inevitably something will happen. Once we accidentally dripped toilet bowl cleaner on the floor and they literally bleached the tile, even though it was cleaned immediately. Also, we have a floating toilet and there is a definite urine stain below the bowl for all the times guests "miss". This does not come out even with some good scrubbing. The recommended solution for stains is to sand and reseal the floor. I don't mind a "lived in" look, but I certainly don't like pee stains and drip marks from each time I accidentally spill something. And I am certainly not planning to sand and seal my bathroom floor every one or two years, per the manufacturers suggestions.
we recommend using our unglazed tile grout. our timberwolf is natural grey in color and has the least amount of pigment. steer clear of permacolor grouts that will stain the tile. ideally tile spacing should be set at 1/16 inch - as tight as possible - to keep the pattern flow. for any cement tile we always recommend miracle's 511 porous plus as a sealant.
I love, love the look, but they are high maintenance. I got white and light gray tiles in the bathrooms, definitely do not recommend white or light colored cement tiles. They stain very easily. The installation is also a challange. Like others said, sealing before grouting (once) and more than three times after is a must. First picture shows tiles after less than a year in use. Second pictures shows freshly installed tiles. My husband never wants this tiles again, and we are already thinking of replacing them in the guest bathroom.
Westside Tile and Stone specialize in high-quality concrete tiles and cement tiles that can be used to install kitchen countertops and backsplash tile. The company offers a wide range of colors and patterns to suit the customer’s preferences for the kitchen design. With highly market competitive rates, Westside Tile and Stone ensure that the concrete backsplash tile will last longer and provide stunning aesthetics for any kitchen. To know your options in terms of concrete tile for the kitchen, contact Westside Tile and Stone today. The experts will guide you through great options and offer an estimated quote.
We also regret using cement tiles. They look great on day 1, but even properly sealed they stain. We are very careful with our tiles, but inevitably something will happen. Once we accidentally dripped toilet bowl cleaner on the floor and they literally bleached the tile, even though it was cleaned immediately. Also, we have a floating toilet and there is a definite urine stain below the bowl for all the times guests "miss". This does not come out even with some good scrubbing. The recommended solution for stains is to sand and reseal the floor. I don't mind a "lived in" look, but I certainly don't like pee stains and drip marks from each time I accidentally spill something. And I am certainly not planning to sand and seal my bathroom floor every one or two years, per the manufacturers suggestions.
if you are using tiles in kitchens, bathrooms, showers, restaurants and lobbies (all high-traffic areas) even after sealing cement tiles- you should expect a degree of patina as your tiles slowly acclimate to their location. if you are not familiar with unglazed surfaces that will age with time (such as limestones, terracottas, marbles etc) and are not a fan of patina, then you may want to select another tile.
Cutting cement tiles takes a bit of extra patience because they’re harder and thicker than the ceramic tiles I’m used to working with.  I found that cutting them face-up allowed for fewer chips on the face of the tile.  When cutting these beauties, you have to be aware of the pattern.  I cut the right and left edges off of 4 tiles.  Then I laid these 3″ strips into the backsplash and called my work done.
The pigment composition is a mixture of high quality white Portland cement, marble powder, fine sand, and natural mineral color pigments. The individual patterns are made by manually applying separate pigments, one by one, in a handmade copper mold. This incredibly delicate and skilled process can only be performed by highly trained artisans with many years of experience creating handmade encaustic cement tile.
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